How to fund 3 must-have classroom tech tools

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Classroom technology is essential, and nothing made that more obvious than the COVID-19 pandemic that forced learning to go virtual and hybrid. Technology upgrades help make students feel included and achieve their full potential. But funding for classroom tech tools is always a challenge.

Funding challenges aren’t impossible to solve, however. Join a panel of experts who, during this eSchool News webinar, will explore the most relevant technologies to help you upgrade your district’s classrooms and enhance learning for all students.

You’ll also learn about the key ways schools can access funding for these critical upgrades by understanding new federal sources, important timelines, and the checklist you need for ensuring your highest chances of funding success.

In this exclusive webinar, you will discover:
• The 3 major classroom technology trends
• How new technology benefits engagement, inclusiveness and social emotional learning
• How to access funding from stimulus programs and annual federal education sources
• How to expand technology from the classroom to the campus for a total technology solution

Laura Ascione
Latest posts by Laura Ascione (see all)

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